College of Communication > Academics > Undergraduate Majors > Media and Cinema Studies (BA) > Summer 2018 Course Detail

Summer 2018 Course Detail

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SUMMER SESSION 1

CMN 102: Introduction to Mass Communication

This course offers students a broad overview of the mass media (print, film, video, recorded music, radio, television and the internet) with a particular focus on how these media impact our everyday lives. Students will develop critical frameworks for understanding how power operates across the media spheres of production, circulation, representation and reception. Attention is placed on how the social categories of race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, age and nationality inform each of these media spheres. The course also considers how recent developments in digital technologies, media convergence and globalization have transformed our media culture.

ONLINE​ Samantha Close​

​MCS 342: History of Television and Radio

A history of radio, television, and cable that engages with elements such as programming, economics, industrial structures, audiences, government and industry policies, and social effects. The course includes viewing, analysis, and criticism of a wide variety of American programming.
​Online Kelly Kessler​

MCS 353: Topics in Media Studies: History of Disney

This course will focus on the many ups and downs over the decades of Disney's slow aesthetic, economic, and cultural growth, providing a foundation for better understanding the company today. In addition to analyzing particular Disney texts (some well-known and many not well-known), special emphasis will be paid to the many facets of the studio's first critical and commercial success in the 1930s, its struggles with bankruptcy throughout the 1940s, and its hugely successful re-branding as a prominent component of a new post-war leisure culture in the 1950s and 1960s. Extensive attention will also be paid to the company's considerable revival and expansion under the "Team Disney" leadership of the 1980s and 1990s, as well as some reflection on the recent investment in once-competing brands such as Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm.

​LOOP TU/TH​ 5:45-9:00​ ​Jason Sperb

SUMMER SESSION 2

CMN 102: Introduction to Mass Communication

This course offers students a broad overview of the mass media (print, film, video, recorded music, radio, television and the internet) with a particular focus on how these media impact our everyday lives. Students will develop critical frameworks for understanding how power operates across the media spheres of production, circulation, representation and reception. Attention is placed on how the social categories of race, class, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, age and nationality inform each of these media spheres. The course also considers how recent developments in digital technologies, media convergence and globalization have transformed our media culture.

​ONLINE ​Scott Vyverman

MCS 271: Media and Cultural Studies

This course provides students with a theoretical and methodological background in the interdisciplinary field of cultural studies, which considers media and culture as sites for the construction and contestation of race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and nation. The course provides a foundation in critical cultural studies, ideology critique, critical race and gender studies, transnational media studies and active audience studies. Formerly Introduction to Radio, Television and Film.

​LPC MW​ ​1:00-4:30 ​Paul Booth

MCS 273: Storytelling and Style in Cinema

Course covers basic concepts and terminology of film and video as forms of art and mass culture. This course covers the aesthetic elements that constitute film and video texts: plot structures, sets, costumes and makeup, acting, lighting, cinematography, editing, and sound.  By performing extensive textual analyses, students learn how the interaction of these elements produces meaning. Students also gain basics of how these concepts are practiced in film production. After mastering the aesthetic concepts, students also examine their use in three different modes of film: fiction, documentary, and the avant-garde.  (Formerly Film/Video Analysis)

​ONLINE Michael DeAngelis​

MCS 348: Topics in Film Genre: Film Noir

Topic description:  In the 1940s and 1950s, Hollywood produced a cycle of dark, strange films that eventually solidified into one of its most well remembered genres: film noir. The hallmarks of film noir are famous: the clipped dialogue and the labyrinthine plots, the dark cities and the rainy nights, the smoky bars and the cramped apartments, the crooked detective and the femme fatale. Yet these traits did more than contribute a bleak, hard-boiled mood to the Hollywood thriller;  they also spoke to a society caught in the throes of overwhelming change. Film noir expressed cultural anxieties about urbanization, crime, and gender, and it grappled with philosophical questions of evil, trauma, and free will. In this course we will explore the rise of film noir, its origins in Hollywood, its resonances with post-WWII American culture, and its legacy in the decades since. While we will spend most of our time on the canonical film noir cycle of the 1940s and 1950s, we will also discuss the neo-noir of the 1970s, as well as some aftershocks in contemporary cinema and popular culture.

​ONLINE ​Dan Bashara
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